Upper Valley towns celebrates Independence Day with rich traditions

Fourth of July celebrations around the region are special to every community, and this year, many towns got a chance to return to their pre-pandemic traditions for the holiday weekend.In Hartland, at Old Home Day, tractors, classic cars, scouts and “It’s really part of our cycle of life,” Harry, a Quechee resident, said. “My family and I have been coming since, probably 25 years. Our kids were very young and they’re now 25 years old and off doing what they do, and we still come back because it just feels right. ”The tradition is kept alive, year after year. “This is Hartland’s day, this is our community day, it always has been,” John Leonard, Hartland Recreation Department director said. “Hartland, long before I was here, Old Home Day has always been a huge day for the town of Hartland, and it feels like everyone who lives in Hartland comes dow “This is the first time we’ve had this event back full scale with” n here and plays a part in this event. ”The crowd of hundreds turned out Monday, eager to forget the 2020 cancellation, and the scaled back event last year. “It’s a great moral boost for the whole community.” Young kids get involved every year, collecting candy “I go to this parade every year and I think this year was extra exciting,” said Carter Moote, a Lebanon resident. “I liked how they had the princesses walking.” It’s all made more special spending it with loved ones. “I think it’s really nice spending time with family on the 4th of July because we get to see a lot of things together, we have fun,” Moote said.In Woodstock, at Billings Farm and Museum, the town celebrated with a “4th on the farm”. The event celebrated the country’s independence w ith traditional games and activities. “These traditions of the games, baseball they’re American traditions, they’re family traditions,” Jen Flaster of Billings Farm & Museum said. and being together. ”The town played a 19th-century version of baseball on farm fields.“ Old fashioned rules and our staff wear old fashioned baseball costumes as well, so you really feel like you’re playing in the 1860’s, 1860 rules, ”Flazer said.“ And the field is set up that way. ”The biggest changes from the modern-day game, no gloves, no called strikes and you can record an out catching the ball after a bounce. like going on outfield when we’re playing the field because it’s really fun to catch something that was hit out there, ”Abby Perella, who’s visiting from Manhattan Beach, California, with her family said.

Fourth of July celebrations around the region are special to every community, and this year, many towns got a chance to return to their pre-pandemic traditions for the holiday weekend.

In Hartland, at Old Home Day, tractors, classic cars, scouts and just about every facet of the community came together for a parade. People lined Skunk Hollow Road to watch the parade and cheer on participants.

“It’s really part of our cycle of life,” Harry, a Quechee resident, said. “My family and I have been coming since, probably 25 years. they do, and we still come back because it just feels right. ”

The tradition is kept alive, year after year.

“This is Hartland’s day, this is our community day, it always has been,” John Leonard, Hartland Recreation Department director said. “Hartland, long before I was here, Old Home Day has always been a huge day for the town of Hartland , and it feels like everyone who lives in Hartland comes down here and plays a part in this event. ”

The crowd of hundreds turned out Monday, eager to forget the 2020 cancellation, and the scaled back event last year.

“This is the first time we’ve had this event back full scale with all the games and all the activities through the COVID era, so it’s really important for the town to get these social opportunities,” Leonard said. boost for the whole community. ”

Young kids get involved every year, collecting candy thrown from passing floats.

“I go to this parade every year and I think this year was extra exciting,” said Carter Moote, a Lebanon resident. “I liked how they had the princesses walking.”

It’s all made more special spending it with loved ones.

“I think it’s really nice spending time with family on the 4th of July because we get to see a lot of things together, we have fun,” Moote said.

In Woodstock, at Billings Farm and Museum, the town celebrated with a “4th on the farm”. The event celebrated the country’s independence with traditional games and activities.

“These traditions of the games, baseball they’re American traditions, they’re family traditions,” Jen Flaster of Billings Farm & Museum said. “It feels like a down home event where everybody is just having fun and being together.”

The town played a 19th-century version of baseball on farm fields.

“Old fashioned rules and our staff wear old fashioned baseball costumes as well, so you really feel like you’re playing in the 1860’s, 1860 rules,” Flaster said.

The biggest changes from the modern-day game, no gloves, no called strikes and you can record an out catching the ball after a bounce.

“It’s really fun, I like going on outfield when we’re playing the field because it’s really fun to catch something that was hit out there,” Abby Perella, who’s visiting from Manhattan Beach, California, with her family said.

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